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Hurricane Watch Net Activation Plans

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(Updated Tuesday, August 30, 2016   12:30 PM EDT – 1630 UTC)

The Hurricane Watch Net is closely watching the development and movement of Tropical Depression 9.

At 11:00 AM EDT – 1500 UTC, the center of Tropical Depression 9 was located near latitude 24.0 north, longitude 87.2 west or about 340 miles west of Key West, FL and about 310 miles west of Havana, Cuba with maximum sustained winds of 35 mph.  Movement was to the west-northwest at 7 mph.

All interests in central and northern Florida, including southeastern Georgia, should monitor the progress of this system.

This system is expected to produce additional rainfall accumulations of 2 to 4 inches over western Cuba through Wednesday with maximum storm total amounts up to 12 inches.  These rains could cause life-threatening flash floods and mud slides.  Storm total rainfall amounts of 5 to 10 inches are possible over much of the Florida peninsula through Friday morning, with isolated maximum amounts of 15 inches possible.  This rainfall may cause flooding and flash flooding.

Tropical Depression 9 is forecast to become a Tropical Storm later today.  The forecaster’s state in the “Discussion Product” for Advisory there is no intensity guidance that makes this system a hurricane prior to landfall. 

Tropical Depression 9, located about 70 miles south of Cape Hatteras, N.C., is moving toward the north-northwest near 5 mph.  A turn toward the north is expected later today, and a turn toward the northeast is forecast on Wednesday.  On the forecast track, the center of the depression will be near the Outer Banks of N.C. this afternoon or this evening.

It appears that TD 8 will not threaten the US East Coast as hurricane.  TD 9, while not forecast to become a hurricane prior to landfall, there is time for Mother Nature to change her mind.  As a precaution, the Hurricane Watch Net remains on “Standby Alert”.

As a reminder, the Hurricane Watch Net activates whenever a Hurricane is within 300 miles of landfall or at the request of the National Hurricane Center.  Should there be a need to activate, we will remain in continuous operation for as long as required.

Our operating frequencies are 14.325 MHz by day and 7.268 MHz by night.  As propagation dictates, we may operate using both frequencies at the same time.

We will make updates to our plans of operation as needed and will announce any changes over the air, via our website, www.hwn.org and will concurrently notify the amateur news media.

Should we need to activate, we will be requesting observed ground-truth data from those in the affected area (Wind Speed, Wind Gust, Wind Direction, Barometric Pressure – if available, Rain, Damage, and Storm Surge).  If you have measured weather data, that would be of great help.  As always, we remind reporting stations to "please" do not report to us the weather information reported by your local media.  We are interested ONLY in YOUR personal observations, preferably measured by calibrated instrumentation.

We are also available to provide backup communications to official agencies such as Emergency Operations Centers and Red Cross officials in the affected area.  We will also be interested to collect and report significant damage assessment data back to FEMA officials stationed in the National Hurricane Center.

As always, we are praying and hoping for the best yet preparing for the worst.

Sincerely,
Bobby Graves
KB5HAV
HWN Net Manager